Consultations

Dr. Castellanos has been invited to various institutions across the country (e.g., New Jersey, Indiana, Kansas, Nebraska, Illinois) to discuss racial ethnic minority student issues in higher education. She has presented close to 100 presentations at national conferences and has delivered multiple keynote and workshops as an invited scholar to numbers state conferences and university events. The workshops and keynotes encompass discussion around ethnic values, higher education recruitment and retention, faculty training, and cultural competence. In addition, she has a series of Latina/o specific workshops which focus on Latina/o issues in higher education – all examining the college experience from a psychological, social, and cultural perspective.

Brief descriptions of specific keynotes, workshops, and presentations include:

MENTORSHIP, GUIDANCE, AND RETENTION: RACIAL ETHNIC MINORITIES AT PWIs
Mentorship is a key component to a quality college experience. It is well documented that mentorship has a positive impact on students’ overall college experience, retention and overall life satisfaction. This workshop addressed various important elements of mentorship, ways to foster good mentorship, and the qualities to developing an effective mentorship pipeline in higher education.

DETOURED FROM THE EDUCATIONAL HIGHWAY
This presentation was an elaborate discourse on racial ethnic minority undergraduate experiences at Predominant White Institutions (PWIs). The presentation included a series of quotes identifying the various challenges students encounter and the resources that facilitate their retention and persistence.

RACIAL/ETHNIC MINORITY STUDENTS: THEIR RESOURCEFULNESS & ITS CULTURAL IMPLICATIONS
This workshop helped faculty and Student Affairs practitioners to better understand ethnic racial minority students – their ethnic values, families, needs, and means of balancing the education system with their personal lives. The faculty were challenged on their attitudes, teaching styles, and understanding of multiculturalism and cultural competence. Specific paradigms, teaching techniques, and retention strategies are introduced to assist faculty and other university staff in working with the new majority – ethnic racial minority students.

LATINA/OS’ PATHWAY TO THE PH.D.: RECRUITMENT, RETENTION & DIRECTIVES
This presentation addressed the Latina/o doctoral experiences at PWIs. The role of age, gender, Latinidad, and family were addressed in the context of completing a degree while preserving one’s well-being. Reviewing nine student narratives, the presenters identified common themes and emergent patterns in the data. For example, unique challenges of doctoral students and their coping techniques (e.g., creating an educational family, cultural resurges, joining Latina/o graduate clubs, and finding a supportive mentor) were highlighted. Last, the implementation of a cultural competence model through a PSC framework was addressed.

LATINAS: HER JOURNEY, HER FIGHT, HER DESTINY
This keynote addressed Latinas’ status in America and higher education. A historical overview was provided on Latinas’ social status, their challenges, and means of resistance in relation to migration, acculturation, transition, and adjustment. Latinas’ college experiences were also highlighted coupled with their cultural values and means for retention in the 21st century.

LATINA/O FACULTY IN HIGHER EDUCATION: RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION AT PWIs
This presentation prompted a discourse identifying faculty representation, experiences, and retention. Main challenges reported by Latina/o faculty at PWIs were identified and universities’ responses to their experiences highlighted. Specific successful program to better attend to Latina/o faculty experiences and efforts to successfully recruit and retain top quality faculty were identified.